Overview


One of the common challenges in education is getting students to go beyond the simple requirements of the course. This is a common phenomenon for teachers who use threaded discussion boards and find students doing the "me, too" and "what she said" kinds of posts. The following are some suggestions for promoting expanded writing using online tools.

The nature of the threaded discussion is that the subject -- often a question or comment piece -- are very close together with all the responses. This encourages the kind of lazy shorthand of "me too" referencing. Further, the nature of the editing tools and the common practice of centralized control of topic and forum result in a lack of ownership or immediacy on the part of the students.

Consider replacing them with:

Blogs and Aggregators

A personal blog space for each student is an excellent way to foster extended writing. It's particularly effective when combined with class aggregation. When all the students can see all the writing -- main and comment -- on all the blogs by going to a single place, the opportunities for finding relevance are greatly expanded.

Further, the fact of ownership of the space means that the student controls the content and is more likely participate, especially when encouraged with positive feedback.


Wiki Spaces

While blogs provide an individual voice, wikis provide a collaborative voice. When you want students to write together, using a wiki works very well. It's a stellar tool for making the kinds of classroom presentations typically abused by PowerPoint. In the first place, it's web-native. In the second place, it is text oriented (so you avoid the slide-by-slide "thesis" presentations). Last, it provides the kind of organizational structure for using a variety of audio and video as appropriate to the subject.


Google Docs

Using Google Docs is just like using Word or Excel but online where you can invite collaborators through e-mail or publish the doc for anyone to see and edit. You do have to have a Google account to create a doc but not to collaborate with someone else. When you choose to collaborate, the person is sent a link which takes them directly to the page they are collaborating on. They will not see any other docs you have, just the one(s) you have chosen to share.


Lesson Plans & Ideas


Click here to add or link to lesson plans or ideas for the use of this technology in the classroom.

Active Discussion Page


Please click here for a discussion page on this technology.

Specific Program Links



Blog Resources



Wikis Resources



Podcasts Resources


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Other Web Links


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Article Links


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Books


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Videos


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Email Lists


  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Other Community Sites

  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE
  • PUT LINKS HERE

Additional Resources


PUT ADDITIONAL RESOURCES HERE